Wills

Making a Will is an essential part of planning for the future. It’s essential, allowing you to specify who should inherit your property, financial assets and possessions.

It makes your wishes clear to those left behind, avoiding unnecessary delays and arguments amongst relatives that can arise when a deceased persons wishes are unclear.

A properly drafted Will can save your loved one’s unnecessary delays at a stressful time.

Without a Will there are a set of rules that will be followed to determine who can and will inherit. This can cause a huge amount of stress and worry for the family and friends you leave behind as well as making the process of administering your estate more complicated.

Around 70% of all people die  without a will,

and if one hasn’t been written then your estate could not be distributed as you would have wished. Dying intestate, which is without a will, could mean that your estate may not pass to your chosen beneficiaries, but also that thousands of pounds may have to be paid in tax. It can be a relatively straightforward process.

However, writing a will can become more complicated as not all family matters are straightforward. Wills can be used in combination with trusts to help avoid any unnecessary taxation and can also ensure that your assets are protected and are guaranteed to be passed to your chosen beneficiaries, regardless of your own personal circumstances.

As well as choosing who the beneficiaries of your will are, another challenging task is to determine who to choose to act as your executors and guardians if you have minors. We have many years of experience in resolving such important decisions and it can be extremely helpful to speak to someone who is independent of the situation.

Your will one of the most important documents you will ever own. It represents your wishes from a lifetime of hard work. The following are some important points to consider when making or updating yours.

WISHES

It makes your wishes clear to those left behind, avoiding unnecessary delays and arguments amongst relatives that can arise when a deceased person’s wishes are unclear. You decide exactly who gets what and exactly how much. This could be anything from personal belongings to pets and property.

CHILDREN

If you have children under the age of 18, you need to make a will to nominate guardians in the event of your death and also to act as trustees of their inheritance until they are legally able to inherit.

RIGHTS OF OCCUPATION

Rights of Occupation ensure loved ones can legally remain in the property even if it eventually goes to another beneficiary.

DISABILTY TRUSTS

Disability Trusts will protect those beneficiaries left behind who are unable to take care of their own finances. Allowing you to appoint people you trust to act as trustees with their best interests at heart..

PROTECTIVE PROPERTY TRUSTS

Protective Property Trusts help towards protecting the deceased’s share of the property if the survivor were to go into care. This also prevents the survivor changing their will to disinherit the deceased’s beneficiaries.

PROTECTIVE PROPERTY TRUSTS

Protective Property Trusts help towards protecting the deceased’s share of the property if the survivor were to go into care. This also prevents the survivor changing their will to disinherit the deceased’s beneficiaries.

WILL STORAGE

If your will gets lost, stolen, damaged or tampered with, it will become invalid. It’s important that it’s kept somewhere safe, preferably away from the home in a secure fireproof location. Complete Estate Protection offer all our clients storage facilities in a secure registered fireproof location and also registration on the National Will Register so in the event of anything happening your will is always locatable and safe.

WILL UPDATES

People will typically change their will 3-4 times during their life time. Circumstances change, people move, die and sometimes argue. The family may grow, grandchildren or great-grandchildren arrive. If things do change it’s important that your will reflects your latest wishes and is updated accordingly in a timely fashion.

Frequently asked questions

Who can act as witnesses of my will?

Anyone can witness the signing of a will as long as they’re not beneficiaries in the will themselves, not related by blood or marriage to anyone in the will and are over 18. Often next-door neighbours or work colleagues are ideal.

How can I change my will?

You can change your will at any time in the future by contacting us on 01642 493101 to arrange the amendments – please note there will be a small administration fee on each occasion you make a change, unless you have chosen to have it securely stored.

When does my will become legal?

Once the final version has been signed, dated and witnessed correctly, then your will is a legal document and needs to be stored safely?

Can a copy of my will be used to carry out my wishes?

No a copy of a will is not a valid legal document, and the original document must be produced after your death so secure storage is vital.

Do I need a will?

Everyone over the age of 18 should have a will in place to ensure their wishes are clear should they die. This is vitally import for all walks of life avoiding the need for loved ones to make impossible decisions at a time of grieving.